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Health Harmony: A Tailored Nutritional Approach for Every Palate – Veggie or Carnivore, We've Got You Covered!

Going veggie is a fantastic choice, but it's crucial to ensure you're getting all the essential vitamins and minerals for optimal health. Let's delve into the discussion about vegetarian-friendly lifestyles, considering our natural omnivorous tendencies.

Veggie diet
If you are a vegetarian you may need some food supplements to ensure a healthy body


A recent study in the UK decided to check out the risk of hip fractures among the meat-eaters, fish-lovers, and vegetarians. The results showed that both guys and gals on the veggie train had a higher chance of hip fractures. Part of the blame went to the body mass index (BMI), basically the ratio of your weight to your height. Turns out, the veggie crew had a lower BMI compared to the other food enthusiasts.


BUT FEAR NOT ALL YOU NEED IS A LITTLE NUTRITIONAL ADVICE AND AT FIT2GO WE ARE HERE TO HELP


So, how does our eating gig impact our health risks?

In a mega study with over 400,000 participants, researchers dug into the UK Biobank data, which is a treasure trove of info from folks aged 40 to 69 in England, Scotland, and Wales. They followed these folks for about twelve and a half years, excluding those who already had a hip fracture or osteoporosis history.

The big reveal? Vegans had lower levels of macronutrients (those are your proteins) and micronutrients (think vitamin D, calcium, vitamin B12, zinc) compared to the meat-eaters. Translation: they might be lacking the good stuff that keeps bones happy and healthy. According to this study, vegans had nearly 20 more fracture cases per 1,000 people. Other studies jumped on the bandwagon, reporting weaker bones in vegetarians and vegans. Blame it on the not-so-adequate intake of calcium and vitamin D, slowing down the bone-forming party and putting our skeletons at risk.

Cutting out meat and all things animal can leave our bodies hungry for some essential nutrients like B12, B2, D, niacin, iron, iodine, zinc, top-notch proteins, omega-3, and calcium. These goodies are mostly found in the animal kingdom. Vitamin B12 deficiency, in particular, has been linked to nerve and blood problems – not exactly a walk in the park.

Vegan and vegetarian diets often play hide-and-seek with minerals, thanks to their phytates content, which likes to mess with the absorption of key minerals like calcium, zinc, iron, iodine, and magnesium. Iron shortage during pregnancy could mean trouble, leading to premature birth, low birth weight, and issues with the baby's brain development. Zinc deficiency isn't a joke either – it's linked to depression, skin problems, upset stomach, and hair loss, common struggles for the plant-based crew. Iodine, essential for thyroid hormones, is a big deal too. A study spilled the beans that 80% of vegans and 25% of vegetarians are running low on iodine, risking hypothyroidism.


TAILORED FOOD SUPPLEMENTS FOR A HEALTHY BODY

Taking a step back and looking at all the studies, it's clear – vegans tend to eat less protein, fewer essential amino acids, and less taurine, setting them up for a carnival of health issues. Long-term veganism and how to avoid bone fractures, muscle loss, anemia, and a not-so-fun lineup of depression, anxiety, and a bunch of other system malfunctions.


Food supplements

But hey, if you're dead set on a meatless life, you gotta play it smart. Bring in the fortified foods and protective supplements for your bones and heart. Think potassium, magnesium, anti-inflammatory phyto-complexes, and the antioxidant superhero, glutathione. Also, load up on essential amino acids, vitamin D3, vitamin K2. Some veggies like broccoli, onions, citrus fruits, and plums can be your bone buddies too. And don't forget the non-food stuff – keep that body weight in check, ditch the tobacco, and throw in a bit of aerobic action to keep osteoporosis at bay.


ARE YOU A MEAT EATER? WELL, THERE HAS BEEN A LITTLE CONFUSION ABOUT THIS TOO - READ ON!



Finally, we've got some clarity on the whole "red meat and health" confusion. A fresh study published in Nature Medicine by the Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation (IHME) says, "Red meat isn't a health risk." This new research challenges the idea that eating meat is bad for your health, putting an end to all the mixed signals we've been getting.

A lot of past studies connecting red meat to things like heart disease, stroke, and cancer had their flaws – they didn't really dig deep into the evidence. The IHME scientists from the University of Washington decided to sort this out. They looked at decades of research on red meat and came up with a more careful analysis, addressing the problems with earlier studies.

So, what's the verdict? This new review found only weak and not-so-significant evidence that red meat might be connected to colorectal cancer, breast cancer, type 2 diabetes, and heart disease. Surprisingly, there's no link between red meat and ischemic stroke, and for hemorrhagic stroke, eating red meat might even lower the risk.


A LITTLE COMMON SENSE, A CUSTOMISED NUTRITIONAL PLAN IS ALL YOU NEED FOR A HEALTHY LIFESTYLE


At Fit2Go Clinic, we're here to be your nutrition sidekick. Whether you're figuring out your diet, battling the bulge, or dealing with being too thin, we've got your back. Let's find the right path to your best body together.




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